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away from the so called fiscal cliff. a drastic combination of mandatory spending cuts and tax hikes that could plunge the united states back into a recession. while there are plenty of hard w0rds from both sides, some terms of a possible zeal are making the rounds. kate bolduan has been following the back and fourth. >> don't get too excited about that, there's only one way to avoid the fiscal cliff. spending cuts and tax hikes. house republicans and president obama need to strike a deal on reducing the national debt. they have soundly rejected a white house offer that included $1.6 trillion in revenue, $400 billion in medicare and other entitlement savings, as well as a permanent increase in the debt limit among other things. so far, the rhetoric has not softened. treasury secretary tim geithner arriving on capitol hill for high level talks, most notably with house speaker john boehner. >> good morning, everyone. >> how did it go? just listen. >> despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious. about real spending cuts. >> a
and congressional leaders gathered to talk about how to avoid the fiscal cliff, the automatic spending cuts and tax increases that go into effect january 1. >> i think we're farther apart but we're coming together. >> i think we're nowhere, period. >> thursday treasury secretary tim geithner presented obama's plan, including $1.4 trillion in tax increases. >> there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. >> president obama also proposed a $16 billion of spending cuts. >> i'm just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. >> the house speaker says republicans put increased revenues including efforts to close tax loopholes and put the tax cuts on the table instead of raising tax rates for anyone. >> if there's another way to get income from upper income americans that doesn't hurt our economy, then why wouldn't we consider it. >> those are publicly unchanged deadlines. whether political theater or political reality, there's more to going over the fiscal cliff far beyond hypothetical. >> i think we're going over the clif. >> if they are going to force higher rates on
because of the impasse and also the fact that the consequences of the fiscal cliff, these spending cuts and these tax -- pardon me the spending cuts and the tax increases that kick in here at the end of the year, the consequences are very dire and following the election the white house and democrats think that they can really push republicans into a corner here. >> brianna keilar for us. thank you. just ahead we're going to be talking with connecticut senator richard blumenthal will join us to talk a little bit about the democrats' responsibility about this impending fiscal cliff. another story we're following, friends and family of kansas city chiefs jovan belcher looking for answers this morning after he killed his girlfriend and then took his own life. his team took to the field just a day after the tragedy. it was i guess kind of a somber victory. they beat the carolina panthers 27-21. just their second game of the season. saturday morning belcher shot his 22-year-old girlfriend kasandra perkins and then turned the gun on himself outside the practice facility. he and perkins leave b
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reforms, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis. and get our economy going again and to create jobs. so right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it's time for the president, congressional democrats, to tell the american people what spending cuts they're really willing to make. with that i'll take a few questions. >> speaker boehner, why will you not tell democrats what specific spending cuts you would like to see, especially within en titlements? >> it's been very clear over the last year-and-a-half, i've talked to the president about many of them. you can can look at our budget. where we outline very specific proposals that we passed in last year's budget and the budget from the year before. we know what the menu is. what we don't know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. >> so your 2011 position still stands then? are you still o
the rates and avoiding the fiscal cliff, where all tax cuts and brakes expire at the end of the year. that is an election, popular at the end of the year, certainly give president obama a lot of clout right now. you can disagree or agree with the policy. that is for you to decide. republican tom cole of oklahoma happens to disagree strongly. at the same time, he recognizes the political reality that all tax cuts will expire on january one, and no one wants to raise taxes on what would amount to 98% of all the taxpayers. >> in my view, we agree we're not going to raise taxes on people that make more than $250,000, we should just take them out of this discuss right now. continue to fight against any rate increases and continue to fight for a much bigger deal. >> congressman cole joins us, the staunchly conservative editorial page of "the wall street journal is on board now. president obama's re-election means that taxes for upper income earners are going up one way or another. the question is how republicans should handle this reality. congressman cole as you heard, a number of other c
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from budget cuts for decades. and that the rhetoric around the fiscal cliff or what i like to call the fiscal bluff is really just a way to thinly shroud these drastic budget cuts that will result in 60,000 people with aids around the world dying. these are preventable deaths that we could otherwise avoid if these budget cuts don't go through. >> let's talk about those cuts because the aids, their speculation is that more than $500 million will be cut from hiv/aids programs in the first year if it goes into effect. do you see the need for entitlement reform at any measure and, if you do, what cuts would your group be okay with? >> so, here's the thing. if we could just pass a tiny tax on the speculative stock transactions, a robinhood tax, we could actually generate up to $350 billion, and i said billion dollars a year. every single year. that would be more than enough money to end the aids pandemic and to have money left over for the largest jobs program that we ever dreamed of and enough money to fight against climate change so us up here in new york won't have to face things lik
over that so-called fiscal cliff. tax hikes and spending cuts kick in if no agreement is reached between the house and republicans on how to close the budget gap. it has been more than two weeks since president obama invited the major players to the white house to discuss the situation. as of this morning, no new talks are scheduled. brianna keilar joins us. so many republicans say they are pessimistic about a deal happening in time to avert this fiscal cliff. some say it's for political reasons. what can you tell us? >> it may all be for political reasons. that's no surprise in washington. as you can seen through dealmaking not just on this but things in the past couple of years between the white house and congress, there is almost this rhythm that has evolved. both sides are pointing to the other for an impasse. republicans like senator lindeyy graham just slamming the white house and tim geithner for a plan he laid out on behalf of the administration, laying out about $1.6 trillion in new revenues coupled with only about $400 billion in medicare cuts. listen to what graham sai
a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. a huge package of tax hikes and spending cuts will kick in january one. they spent time blaming each other for not getting serious. in his weekly address, president obama says he is ready to make a deal but wouldn't accept continued tax cuts for the wealthiest people. >>> the senate has already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. and if we can just get a few house republicans on board, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. but, it is unacceptable for some republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they refuse to let tax rates go up on the richest americans. >> republicans say tax hikes on the wealthy mean tax hikes for small businesses, something they insist they cannot accept. here is long-time gop senator orin hatch. >> unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are indicating a disastrous thelma and louise idea, that will put us in jeopardy, for small business and other parts of the e
's somewhat abstract. >> how do republicans change that message, because we're in the middle of fiscal cliff negotiations, and all you hear are about preserving tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. that just feeds into this lack of connecting to the middle class that's been a problem. >> here's your answer and it's difficult and nuanced. traditionally republicans economic message that resonated with the middle class is our taxes will be lower on you. democrats have co-opted on that. they promise taxes on the middle class but do it simultaneously with giving high spending that. cannot last forever so republicans have to make people realize that is a utopia that doesn't exist. you can't have low taxes and high spending that democrats are currently promising. >> we've had $520 billion spent on jobless benefits over the past five years, and i bet they are probably pretty evenly divided between republicans and democrats and the big message on government spending has been distorted because we've had a crazy recession. i want to bring in anna because the president built that winning location of a
days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. drastic cuts that some feel will plow us back into a recession. >> only negotiations between the republicans and the white house have stop it. president obama tried to step up the pressure on republicans, visiting a family in northern virginia whose taxes would go up by some $4,000 a year if an agreement isn't reached. >> they're keeping it together. they're working hard. they're meeting their responsibilities. for them to be burdened unnecessarily because democrats and republicans aren't coming together to solve this problem gives you a sense of the costs involved in very personal terms. >> the president also met with new jersey's governor chris christie over at the white house. the republican governor was here in washington to talk about hurricane sandy relief efforts, and now they're in danger of going over the fiscal cliff with the rest of the country at the end of the month. our national political correspondent jim acosta has been covering this story for us. what's the latest with chris christie in washington. >> reporter: t
increases and spending cuts that people here in washington call the fiscal cliff. most house members are going home today with only 27 days to make a deal. two house leaders who are not going home are with me in the situation room. they're working very hard to avoid the fiscal cliff. thanks so much for coming in. for so long, republicans wanted to extend the bush tax cuts forever, now for 98% of the american people, the democrats are saying, we're ready. we've given up, we'll let you have those bush tax cuts for as long as possible. let's just resolve that, we'll move on to some of the tougher issues later. let's make sure that 98% of the american families have these lower tax rates into next year. why not give that? >> the debate over those top two pshsz, is really a strong man debate. what we need is tax reform in america. we need a simpler less complicated tax code. >> i agree with you. we need a tax reform. why not resolve this one issue, make sure taxes don't increase for 98% of the americans, 100% of americans for their first $250,000 a year. let them have that, and then move o
any sense to me because while that sounds like logic, there's that other side of the fiscal cliff, all those horrible cuts that could plunge us into a depression and all the rest that no democrats want either. so are you serious, you really -- are you really saying what i think you're saying, that is that it might be a strategy that the president really wants? wants us all to go over the cliff? and then just blame you? >> yeah. that i think that's to his political advantage to do that, because then he gets to blame us, set up the 2014 elections by us being the bad guys. but look at this. a lot of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle like the $600 billion hit to the defense department and they'll absorb the 2% of cuts to the other programs out there, and remember, none of the cuts that are in the sequestration have to do with the big three on the entitlement programs. most of us would love to see an erskine-bowles type of solution put on the table here. >> so what if there were -- >> the simpson-bowles, sorry. >> simpson-bowles, i understood what you mean. there is an erskine bo
and congressional leaders met to talk about how to avoid the fiscal cliff. the automatic spending cuts and tack increases that begin to kick in if there's no agreement by january 1st. 16 days to get here. >> i think we're far apart still, but i think we're moving closer together. >> i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> reporter: thursday treasury secretary timothy geithner proposed president obama's plan which included $1.6 trillion in tax revenue coming largely from an expiration of bush era tax cuts for families who make more than $250,000 a year. geithner says that's a must. >> there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. >> reporter: the administration's plan also included $50 billion in new stimulus spending. boehner says the entire proposal represented three weeks of wasted time. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. >> reporter: the house speaker says republicans have put increased revenues, including efforts to close tax loopholes and reform the tax code, on the table instead of raising tax rates for anyone. >> the fa
cliff. the across-the-board spending cuts and sharp tax increases that hit in just 29 days. let's get straight to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's watching what's going on. dana, the tax rates, first of all, let's get to a major sticking point right now. there's been a counterproposal from house republicans to the white house. you have details. >> reporter: that's right. let's start exactly where you just began on those tax rates because that has become the big divide between the two sides. the answer is the house republicans are not budging. they still want to continue the bush era tax rates at all income levels. let's get specific. first of all, the counterproposal, they say they would get about $800 billion in savings from what they call tax reform, from deductions and closing loopholes, things like that. but the bush era tax rates, all of them would remain, even for the wealthiest. to show you the difference, compared to the white house offer that they got last week, $1.6 trillion in savings when it comes to tax revenue. but much of that came from raising ta
of a deal now and that will keep us from going over the fiscal cliff. then let the tax cuts expire for the wealthy january 1st. it happens. then you can do some kind of negotiation. and that keeps us from going over the fiscal cliff. it's going to happen anyway, right? >> this is the very kind of shell game they run in washington. if you'll just give me my tax increases today, i surely will give you your spending restraint tomorrow. >> but you have no leverage in the debate. >> we never see these spending reductions materialize. that's the problem. we're borrowing roughly 40 cents on the dollar, much of it from the chinese, sending the bill to our children and grandchildren. that's unwise and unsustainable. frankly, i think it's immoral. and what you're saying is that republicans ought to agree, and somehow vote for a big proposed tax increase in hopes that in decade decades to come that this president will do something about spending. >> no, i didn't say that. what i said was why not -- why don't republicans and democrats vote for a tax -- to keep the taxes lower for middle class
the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> reporter: at the white house. >> this is available not just here but to everyone in the world who has an internet connection. and i know things are done the old fashioned way sometimes on cap
party. you're a republican, he's democrat. 30 days and counting until we go over the fiscal cliff unless congress in the white house cuts a deal to avoid tax cuts. it sounds like two groups of people are looking at two different sets of numbers. take a look. >> we prefer to do upfront alongside a deal that includes raising rates on americans. we are prepared to do a meaningful amount of spending on the saving side, not just to avoid the damage of the sequester but to help reduce our long-term deficit. >> i was disappointed by the president's proposal. i think it is essentially a rerun of his budget proposal. the revenue proposals are $1.6 trillion in revenue and tax increases. it's a massive tax increase. but also not significant and meaningful in entitlement reforms. >> so, anna, i hear comments like those and remarks by john boehner and the president of the united states and i wonder after the election, did we learn anything? because i -- my reading on the election was that the people, the voters wanted compromise. and for the people in washington to talk to each other not at each othe
a deal on that fiscal cliff. just 31 days left until we hit those $7 trillion in automatic spending cuts and tax increases if negotiations break down. and both sides of the aisle are going straight to the public in order to plead their case, or rather tell us why the other side is to blame. this is president obama in his weekly radio address. >> both parties say we should keep middle class taxes low. the senate has already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. and if we can just get a few house republicans onboard, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. but it's unacceptable for some republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they refuse to let tax rates go up on the wealthiest americans. >> in the republican response, senator orrin hatch takes th s hostage metaphor one step further and brings to mind a memorable movie scene. >> unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are offering a disastrous thelma and luiz strategy that would take u
on the stump pressing republicans to cut a deal averting the fiscal cliff. >> it's like the lump of coal you get for christmas. it's a scrouge christmas. >> there's a stalemate, let's not kid ourself rs. >> reporter: things got tense after secretary geithner visited capitol hill thursday to present what republicans are calling an unreasonable proposal. it includes $1.6 trillion in new taxes. in part, through raising rates on the top 2%. and lips loopholes and reductions. $50 billion in stimulus next year, and $400 billion in medicare and other entitlement savings to be worked out. >> i think the proposal delivered here by secretary geithner was not a serious proposal. >> they want this extra spending that's greater than the amount willing to cut. >> democrats say it was just a starting point. and one republicans should counter. >> there will be prolonged negotiations. and all of us are going to have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. >> cnn learned last week the republicans gave the white house their own starting position, which democrats consider unbalanced. extending all
nations. >>> 30 days to avoid the country falling off the fiscal cliff. everyone's taxes go up and automaticpending cuts take
time, we're getting a look at what the white house is offering to stop the fiscal cliff stalemate. drastic mandatory tax hikes and spending cuts will kick in with the new year unless the white house and the republicans can reach a deal. for weeks, gop lawmakers have said we're just waiting for the white house to give details, specifics, some numbers. well, tonight that's happened. the white house is calling their bluff and they've laid out how they want to cut the debt. jessica yellin is over at the white house for us tonight with new developments. jessica, what are the specifics of this offer tonight? >> reporter: hi, wolf. according to senior officials on both sides of the aisle, the president is asking for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that includes raising taxes for families who make $250,000 or more. you'll recognize that as a pledge from his campaign. and it also includes limiting deductions and loopholes as well as other changes to capital gains and dividends taxes. well, that is the headline for republicans, wolf, who say it is far more money in tax rates than they ever expe
, 27 days until the fiscal cliff. and i know you know that already, but guess what, folks? the deadline for congress and the white house to act, to stop the tax increase and punishing spending cuts, that deadline is coming up quicker than you may realize because did you know, congress plans to end its current session on december 21st? check your calendar as we did today. that's two weeks from friday. that means that under congressional rules any agreement, any legislation to fix this whole mess would have to be filed here by december 28th. here's the kicker. the president currently plans to leave town the day before that, on the 17th of this month. so the yearly obama trip to hawaii is set to start a week from next monday. you feel me here? see where i'm going? the window closing faster than folks think. what are our decisionmakers doing right now? among other things they are apparently sending signals through the media. republicans saying time to get moving. the president saying there is a deal to be had fairly quickly if the republicans come around to raising taxes on the wealthy. let
of the sticking point when it comes to the bush era tax cuts and the fiscal cliff? who should be pay be taxes. >> i wasn't able to hear your previous report, but i sure can tell you from, you know, being with the president recently, that i'm very encouraged by how comprehensive everybody is and how they're trying to work together to address both the revenue side, but also in addition to the spending side. >> how do you mean, if i may, how you to mean comprehensive? >> meaning that it has got to cover all the different pieces on both the revenue and on the spending side. and the other piece about comprehensive to me is the fact it is not just about the make now, but everything in that package needs to address the further development of the business environment that allows economic development to occur. and so i'm very encouraged by that. i think we're going to come together for the good of economic development of our country. >> let me try to pin you down a little bit more, specifically, alan, because another ceo, lloyd blankfine, head of goldman sachs, met with the president, part of the grou
to raise just those rates would avoid the fiscal cliff, where all bush era tax cuts on all tack tax brackets expire at the ends of the year. the election, popular opinion and more give president obama a lot of clout right now. and you can agree or disagree with the president's policy. that's for you to decide. republican congressmen tom cole of oklahoma disagrees stronsly. at the same time, he recognizes the political reality that all tax cuts will expire on january 1st and no one wants to raise taxes on what would amount to 98% of all taxpayers. >> in my view, we all agree that we're not going to raise taxes on people that make less than $250,000. we should just take them out of discussion right now. continue to fight against any rate increases, continue to try to work honestly for a much bigger deal. >> congressman cole joins us shortly. a rock rib conservative. chair of the national republican congressional committee, and he's no longer a lone voice in the wilderness. the staunchly conservative editorial page of "the wall street journal" is on board as well. i'm quoting now. the
. thanks. >>> the fiscal cliff debate hitting a new low. 28 days tax hikes and spending cuts will create a lot of pain for nearly every american if a deal does not get done. republicans offering up a counterproposal to the president that calls for $2.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next decade. it includes $800 billion in tax reforms. $600 billion for medicare reforms. and $600 billion in spending cuts. but it does not contain tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. so the president immediately dismissed it. and if you want to know just how far apart the two parties are, this should clear it up for you. >> i think we're going over the cliff. >> it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> what we can't do is kind of figure out what works for them. >> the president's idea of a negotiation is roll over and do what i ask. >> it's pretty clear to me they've made a political calculation. >> their ideas are different from ours, we can't guess what they are. >> we look forward to the time when they are specific. >> they need to be more specific.
. this is not the whole fiscal cliff but just the sequester. $1.2 trillion of mandatory spending cuts over ten years and scheduled for january 2nd. half of that money cut in defense. half in everything else. next year alone could take $65 billion out of spending and a million jobs versus growing 2 million which is what the u.s. is on track to do now. i fully understand the government needs to spend less and spend more efficiently but how you achieve it is as important as how much you cut and the sledge hammer approach is not economically sound. now, there are targeted and measured ways to do it without driving the country in to another recession. some debate today as to whether we're in one or not but the sequester will only make things worse. congress, solve it. solve it nowme. we're all watching. housing is hot. if you have credit and money for a down payment, the perfect time to buy. nationally, affordability is the best it's been in a long time. new york city is the least affordable place in america to purchase a home. no big surprise here. home prices in new york are nearly two and a half times
, we're in this situation because congress came up with what they're calling the fiscal cliff now and they're calling it the fiscal cliff because they don't want to e embrace either the tax increases or spending cuts and i think it's foolish to think this congress can come up with a better deal. >> you know what's interesting, to eric's point, there is a great irony in this that the democrats are saying we've got to raise taxes and the fiscal cliff does both. just not in the way anybody wants it, so if they can't do that, how are they going to find a way they can all agree on? >> the superfailed committee. this is a giant hatchet as opposed to a scalpel. >> it was designed to fail. >> i agree, but the real solution and real irony is going to be the ultimate deal's going to look like the obama boehner grand bargain that was negotiated and almost done in the summer of 2011. the fact that we couldn't make that deal then i think's a tragedy for the country. one of the thing's it did was lead to that aaa downgrading. that was unnecessary. >> let me just follow up on this point of what
the disastrous combination of tax rate increases and spending cuts now known as the fiscal cliff. >> president obama is sending tim geithner to the hill today to meet with multiple congress ohhal leaders. i want to bring in senator john barrasso, republican from wyoming. senator, good to see you. good morning. >> thanks for having me. >> let's begin with something that's been reported on by the wall street journal. which is something we heard a couple days ago. the fact that the president now appears to be flexible when it comes to the top 2%. quote, president obama signalled he wouldn'tnsist tax rates on upper income americans rise to clinton era peaks as part of a deficit reduction deal. the white house's flexibility first described by democrat erskine bowles after meetings with mr. obama and others confirmed by administration officials could envision tax rates increase from their current levels but less than clinton era levels. would you agree to a deal, senator? call it in the middle. 37%. >> well, the problem with that is raising those tax rates on those folks really doesn't address the m
federal spending cuts unless congress and the president act so-called fiscal cliff. on the senate floor today, top senate democrat, here he was, harry reid, said the republican counteroffer unveiled yesterday is a serious proposal. reid called the offer a nonstarter. his word. but a serious proposal nonetheless. in an interview just today with bloomberg tv, president obama did not reject the gop offer outright. officials have called it a step backward, not worthy of a counteroffer. but, you know, bottom line here, you have two sides they appear to be pretty far apart with no new negotiations happening at least not to our knowledge. so, with me now from capitol hill is representative peter wel welch. democrat from vermont. good to see you. thanks for coming on. >> thank you. >> so let me just pose this one to you. you just heard harry reid, would you agree with harry reid the plan offered yesterday by that house speaker is, quote unquote, a serious plan? >> well, you know, i don't know the details of it. it is $800 billion supposedly in revenues and it is a lot of medicare cuts but not s
obama is back on the stump pressing republicans to cut a deal averting the fiscal cliff. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> reporter: republicans say they want their christmas, too, and blame the president for the deadlock. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult. >> reporter: things got tense after treasury secretary geithner visited capitol hill thursday to present what republicans are calling an unreasonable proposal. it includes $1.6 trillion in new taxes. in part through raising rates on the top 2% and limiting loopholes and deductions. $50 billion in stimulus next year and $400 billion in medicare and other entitlement savings to be worked out. >> i think that the proposal that was delivered here by secretary goieithner to the speaker and me yesterday is not a serious proposal. >> they want to have this extra spending that actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. >> but democrats say it was just a starting point and one republicans should counter. >> there
, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action considering what we know about the red line, if you will, that hillary clinton laid out pretty clearly? >> it was very important for her to draw a very clear line. because any use of chemical weapons has to be responded to internationally. i'm sure the secretary of state is immersed with russia right now, is in negotiations with russia for a united front against this absolutely unacceptable possibility. >> okay. so she's l
to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different than what's on the table there. $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is two times the amount in the boehner pl
for word. but first this, the fiscal cliff, the talks hit a huge road bump. zingers and verbal jabs are flying while actual talks are at a stand still. president obama says republicans must agree to preserve a middle class tax cut as first part of any deal. and he linked republicans to scrooge today while touring a pennsylvania toy factory. listen. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. every family, everybody here, you'll see your taxes go up on january 1st. i mean, i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. that is sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> that's pretty scroogy, right? president obama's proposal calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenue. $50 billion for new stimulus spending. and about $400 billion in entitlement cuts. republicans say, the president's proposal's nothing but a political stunt. here is boehner. >> the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax
over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed co
days and counting to the country's potential fall off the fiscal cliff. avoiding it will depend on what lawmakers in these two buildings do or don't do. if they do nothing, everyone's taxes go up and automatic spending cuts take effect. still, it appears congress and the president are digging in with no deal in sight. >> if they are going to force hi higher rates on virtually all americans because they're unwilling to let tax rates go up on 2% of americans, then that's a choice they're going to have to make. >> this isn't an issue about democrats or republicans. my goodness, this is about our country. >> well, one thing both sides agree on is the government needs to raise more money. how much? how they do it? those are two of the many sticking points and the clock is ticking. >>> a series of suicide car bombings leave five people dead in eastern afghanistan today. inis yo no reports of any u.s. casualties. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attacks. >>> and in wyoming a college teacher may have saved the lives of several of his students. authorities are praising the instruct
, starting january 1st we go over that so-called fiscal cliff, tax rates go up not just for the rich but for the middle class, for everyone, all those cuts in domestic spending and naths security spending, they go into effect. people aren't going to be happy about that, and the president will be able to say, look, i begged them, i repeatedly said 98% of the american public, they wouldn't get a tax increase if we just took them out of the equation, let's pass legislation extending the bush tax cuts for everyone earning under $250,000 a year. they didn't do it. so, you know, he'll have some leverage on that in terms of the politics because politically, you know, the polls all are very consistent. the election results are pretty consistent. the american public is ready for a modest increase in taxes for the upper 2% of taxpayers. having said that, there's another issue that's coming up in february or march and that's raising the debt ceiling once again. the republicans have a lot of leverage on that right now because the white house, the administration will desperately want to raise tha
fall off the fiscal cliff. avoiding it -- if they do nothing, everyone's taxes go up and automatic spending cuts will take effect. no imminent deal is in sight. >> if they are going to force higher rates on virtually all americans, because they're unwilling to let tax rates go up on 2% of americans, then that's a choice we're going to have to make. >> i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. we have put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking for the whole entire time. >> in other words not quite a good place to be, but both sides agree that the government needs to raise more money. how much and how they do it are two of the major sticking points. >>> and protests and a constitutional crisis, what is next for egypt. we'll dig deeper into the struggle for power between conservative islamists and liberal secularists. and later, brad pitt talks about his future with angelina jolie. >>> and a dog
parts of the proposals to avert that fiscal cliff will really have. tonight we tackle the much-discussed concept of increasing tax rates for the top 2%. chief business correspondent ali velshi joins me now. help us cut through the spin. the partisans all have a different take on this. if you raise taxes on the top 2%, what's the impact? what does it look like and how much of an impact would it have on the deficit? >> well, let's look at it in two ways. one is income tax, right? right now, the highest earners, those households that earn more than a quarter million dollars a year, pay a higher tax rate on the marginal amount, the amount above the $250,000 a year. so we're talking about taking that rate from 36% to 39.6% if we even go there. that hasn't even been negotiated yet but that's 3.6% on every dollar you earn above $250,000. there are not a lot of studies that suggest that that would have catastrophic effects on the economy. the other area that democrats want to raise taxes are on investment income, things like capital gains, dividend income. now, those will jump signific
thish to drove us off the fiscal cliff. we're in the political dance now. we've seen this time and time again. there is still three weeks for a deal to be cut. the problem is that the white house threw down a heavy marker yesterday. we'll have to see if they're willing to compromise. it's got to be compromised on both sides. >> that's right. the marker they threw down, kevin, is it the white house says actual tax rates, the top tax rate, 35%, has to go up for the rich. and that limiting deductions won't be enough to get a deal. now you wrote in the atlantic this week that despite that there is a way around this for republicans who don't want to incur the wrath of norquist or as mark suggests, voters. how? >> right. so grover norquist pledge is actually incredibly misunderstood. it's based on what washington budgeting organizations call the current law baseline. what that means is that what scheduled to go into effect already is baked into the cake. and because the bush tax cuts are expiring provisions that were voted for ten years ago, it doesn't really count as a tax hike when they're
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